Effective July 1, under a change in state law, Kansas drivers can no longer be charged with a crime for refusing a sobriety test. The Wichita Eagle published an article on July 2, 2019, about this change, and DUI Defense Attorney, B. Keith Edwards responded to the editor with the following: On the front page…

The Lawrence Police Department is holding a sobriety checkpoint this weekend. Sobriety checkpoints are constitutional as long as certain guidelines are followed. One requirement is that the organization conducting the checkpoint provides notice of its plan. According to LJWorld.com, the LPD will conduct the checkpoint between 11 p.m. on October 14, 2016, and 3 a.m….

Refusing or Taking a Breath Test If you are arrested for DUI, you will be read an “implied consent advisory” and asked whether you will consent to take a blood alcohol test, usually in the form of a breath test. You should consider the following when deciding whether to refuse or take the test. Recently…

There are several things you should and should not do when stopped for DUI in Kansas. Below we have laid out some of the most important tips to remember during your traffic stop. We have also put together a nice little DUI info-graphic that you can print out and put in your vehicle to review…

The United States Supreme Court has agreed to decide three cases that question whether police officers can get blood or breath tests from DUI suspects without a search warrant and whether a person can be charged with a crime for refusing these tests. Two of these cases come from North Dakota and the other comes…

Standardized Field Sobriety Tests The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has adopted standardized field sobriety tests (“SFTS”) that may produce reliable indications of intoxication. But they are only reliable if police administer the tests correctly. The three SFTS tests and the “clues” that law enforcement officers look for are based on the premise that intoxicated…

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